jumpingwithoutlooking:

badkittybarbi:

#machetedontfuckaround

This is my favorite.

jumpingwithoutlooking:

badkittybarbi:

#machetedontfuckaround

This is my favorite.

29 notes

humansofnewyork:

"It’s tough to be a journalist in this country. I’ve been arrested four times. It’s very difficult to get information. Government institutions are forbidden to talk to you. Ordinary people are extremely suspicious, because they think you might be security services. But it’s very important work. People need to know where the oil money is going, who’s benefiting from the contract, where the proceeds are being used. The ordinary person doesn’t know, and has never before needed to know. For decades, people have been conditioned to the idea that only government officials can make decisions on their behalf. It will take some time for the country to learn individual responsibility. It will take time and education to teach ourselves. But I believe that education is like cleaning yourself. And I think if you come back in fifteen or twenty years, this will be a very different country. With education, the spirit of being hostile will vanish.”(Juba, South Sudan)

humansofnewyork:

"It’s tough to be a journalist in this country. I’ve been arrested four times. It’s very difficult to get information. Government institutions are forbidden to talk to you. Ordinary people are extremely suspicious, because they think you might be security services. But it’s very important work. People need to know where the oil money is going, who’s benefiting from the contract, where the proceeds are being used. The ordinary person doesn’t know, and has never before needed to know. For decades, people have been conditioned to the idea that only government officials can make decisions on their behalf. It will take some time for the country to learn individual responsibility. It will take time and education to teach ourselves. But I believe that education is like cleaning yourself. And I think if you come back in fifteen or twenty years, this will be a very different country. With education, the spirit of being hostile will vanish.”

(Juba, South Sudan)

3,807 notes

skunkbear:

Have you heard of the mystery of the sailing stones? It’s not a Hardy Boys novel — it’s the strange phenomenon of rocks leaving zig-zagging tracks across Death Valley.

Well, they solved the mystery at last.

Image: Momatiuk - Eastcott/Corbis / Video: Jim Norris

4,077 notes

humansofnewyork:

"I have to work thirteen hours a day, so I don’t get to see her very much. But I’m getting older. So I’m afraid if I don’t work all I can now, there might be a time that I can’t support my family anymore."(Kampala, Uganda)

humansofnewyork:

"I have to work thirteen hours a day, so I don’t get to see her very much. But I’m getting older. So I’m afraid if I don’t work all I can now, there might be a time that I can’t support my family anymore."

(Kampala, Uganda)

1,981 notes

humansofnewyork:

"A few years ago, I got a call on my cell phone from a twelve year old child from my village. He was calling me from a bus stop. He’d taken a bus into the city alone, and he was calling me to ask if I could help him find a way to go to school. Both of his parents had died of AIDS, and he had no money for tuition. I told him to stay where he was, and left work immediately to pick him up. At first I was very mad at him. He should not have travelled alone. But then I looked at him and I saw myself. I’d also been desperate to go to school after my father was killed, but we had no money. So even though I was suffering myself, I told him I would try to help him. My salary was not enough, so I tried many things to get the money. After work, I went to the landfill to hunt for recyclables. But after I paid to have them cleaned, there was no money left. Now I’m trying to make bricks. I have a small operation in the village to make bricks, and I sell them in the city. It doesn’t make much money, but it’s enough to pay tuition for the boy and three of his siblings.” (Kampala, Uganda)

humansofnewyork:

"A few years ago, I got a call on my cell phone from a twelve year old child from my village. He was calling me from a bus stop. He’d taken a bus into the city alone, and he was calling me to ask if I could help him find a way to go to school. Both of his parents had died of AIDS, and he had no money for tuition. I told him to stay where he was, and left work immediately to pick him up. At first I was very mad at him. He should not have travelled alone. But then I looked at him and I saw myself. I’d also been desperate to go to school after my father was killed, but we had no money. So even though I was suffering myself, I told him I would try to help him. My salary was not enough, so I tried many things to get the money. After work, I went to the landfill to hunt for recyclables. But after I paid to have them cleaned, there was no money left. Now I’m trying to make bricks. I have a small operation in the village to make bricks, and I sell them in the city. It doesn’t make much money, but it’s enough to pay tuition for the boy and three of his siblings.” 

(Kampala, Uganda)

13,220 notes